Python Print Jacket

 

IMG_1635Better late than never for #JungleJanuary!

On my SWAP list was a neutral all-purpose indoor/outdoor casual jacket that I could wear when it’s cool in the summer.  “Cool summer” places include work, car, grocery store, and commuter train so basically everywhere except at home.  I had originally envisioned a natural or cream colored belted jacket in linen similar in style to Collette’s Lady Grey coat, but that morphed into this moto inspired jacket once I saw this snake print.

 

Fabric  –  Ah yes, the fabric is what this is all about, right?  All thoughts about the all-purpose cream color were set aside when I saw this lightweight cotton twill in cream, black, taupe, and grey.  It’s from Emma One Sock of course, purchased in 2014.  I laid it out as a single layer so I could see all of the print which is not symmetrical.  Luckily it doesn’t have a nap so I could rotate the various left or right pieces 180 degrees so the print would be roughly symmetrical with the darker swaths on the sides.

It’s lined in a dotted grey silk purchased eons ago.  It has a bit of a matte texture so it’s not always easy to slide on, but it’s warm.

Pattern  –  Self-drafted!

This jacket is based on an as yet un-blogged fitted linen jacket with set in sleeves, shawl collar, and peplum drafted using the Armstrong pattern drafting book.  I converted the linen draft to the python version using my newest pattern drafting book, Metric Patternmaking for Jackets and Coats that my honey gave me for Christmas a couple of years ago.  Love!  I only made one muslin to check the raglan draft, design the front opening and collar, and to check the ease through the body.

Features:

  • Raglan sleeves with overarm seam.
  • Faced elbow length cuffs with zips.
  • Front and back princess seams.
  • Moto-inspired diagonal exposed separating zipper. One side of the zip extends up into the shoulder seam.
  • Mandarin collar with contoured front.
  • Applied pocket with zipper and lining.
  • Cuffs and pocket have an ultra-suede detail to cover the ends of the zips.
  • Fully lined.
  • Long enough to cover a big shirt or long sweater.

IMG_1637Construction  –  The construction itself was straight-forward; no tailoring, no shoulder pads, no sleeve heads, so relatively easy to make.  Jackets for Real People has recommendations as to what type of interfacing to use where for different types of fabrics, so with a bit of experimentation, I decided on three different types; one type at the front, a different one at the at the front facings, and a third for the collar and cuffs.  Next time I would double the collar interfacing and beef up the front facing as it’s not quite as firm as I would like.

The big news here is that this is my first bagged lining and it looks very sharp!  I followed the technique in Jackets for Real People and I’ll definitely do it this way again.  It has such a professional look!  You get a clean finish where the facing, lining, and hem all meet at the front.

IMG_1696

Fit  –  I drafted this and made the muslin over a long weekend in February.  It then sat on Helena for two months until I got the courage to try it on and work out the fit.  With a few tweaks I decided it was ‘pretty good’ and ran with it. I had a difficult time eliminating some puffiness at the upper back which I unfortunately think comes from my sloper.  At the same time, it’s tight across the back when I reach forward so I can’t remove the puffiness.  I need to figure this one out as it’s happened before.

Also it could use another inch or two of ease at the waist and hips.  I did want it fitted but not quite so fitted!

Update: Yep, I can correct some of the puffiness by adding more ease at the back at the waist and hip so it falls better.

Lessons Learned

  • First bagged lining.
  • First raglan sleeve draft. Woohoo!
  • First time removing coiling zipper teeth. Duh, it really is a coil!
  • There are so many more zippers out in the world than what we see at Joann’s. I ordered a variety of jacket zippers from Wawak.  The colors and sizes were trial and error, but I learned about zipper sizing so next time I’ll have a better feel for what to order.  The front zip is a size #5.
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6 thoughts on “Python Print Jacket

  1. Awesome Job Meg! I have a similar fabric that I want to sew into a similar jacket. I started making a muslin of Style Arc’s Ziggi, but screwed up the front so I tossed it to the UFO pile. You have inspired me to get it out and try again.

    Like

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